Quick facts about the Uniform Civil Enforcement of Money Judgments Project


7 February 2017

By Kevin Zakreski

This post is part of a series highlighting four projects endorsed in the Agenda for Justice 2017 published by the Canadian Bar Association, BC Branch. To read the other posts in the series click here.

About the project

BCLI’s Uniform Civil Enforcement of Money Judgments Project:

  • was carried out from 2004 to 2005 and was supported by the Ministry of Justice for British Columbia;
  • built on work carried out by the Uniform Law Conference of Canada with the assistance of a volunteer project committee from 1998 to 2004;
  • culminated in a final report containing a draft of a recommended Civil Enforcement of Money Judgments Act;
  • was the subject of a public consultation held by the ministry of justice from June to July 2015.

What will the Civil Enforcement of Money Judgments Act do?

The Civil Enforcement of Money Judgments Act will:

  • consolidate rules on money-judgment enforcement that are currently spread across a host of statutes in a single act;
  • integrate money-judgment enforcement with British Columbia’s personal-property-security system;
  • modernize rules and procedures for seizure of personal property and accounts, bringing them into line with what is found in many other Canadian provinces and territories.

Why should the legislature enact it?

The Civil Enforcement of Money Judgments Act will benefit British Columbians by:

  • modernizing and streamlining the process of enforcing money judgments;
  • simplifying access to the law by placing all the key rules on money-judgment-enforcement in a single statute;
  • protecting vulnerable debtors with an up-to-date set of exemptions from enforcement.

For more information on the Uniform Civil Enforcement of Money Judgments Project, please visit the project webpage.


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